Permancy planning meeting dispute

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Lolli
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Joined: Tue Jun 02, 2020 3:07 pm

Permancy planning meeting dispute

Post by Lolli » Tue Jun 02, 2020 4:23 pm

I gave my daughter to social services under a section 20, at the PPM meeting yesterday the LA said they want to introduce the SGO to my daughter via Skype meetings. I have not agreed to the SGO and neither has the court ...... Can the LA still set up contact with my 19 month old daughter without my consent ?

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Suzie, FRG Adviser
Posts: 3460
Joined: Mon Jul 04, 2011 2:57 pm

Re: Permancy planning meeting dispute

Post by Suzie, FRG Adviser » Wed Jun 03, 2020 1:02 pm

Dear Lolli

Welcome to the parents’ discussion forum and thank you for posting.

My name is Suzie and I am the online adviser at Family Rights Group.

I see from your post that you are concerned about your daughter, aged 19 months, being introduced to the person or persons who have been assessed as proposed special guardians for your daughter. You say that your daughter is currently looked after by children’s services under s.20 to which you agreed. It is not clear from your post whether there is an ongoing court case, that is, care proceedings (although I assume there is) for your daughter and the care plan is for her to be placed with the special guardians in the long term.

The fact there has been a permanency planning meeting suggests that a decision is being made about your daughter’s future care. It may be that you are opposed to a special guardianship order being made as you hope to have your daughter returned to your care but your circumstances are not clear. If there is a care plan which requires children’s services to start the transition process for your daughter from foster care then it is necessary for contact to start so that your daughter can get to know (if she does not already) and build a relationship before a permanent move if the court makes a special guardianship order in their favour.

The short answer to your question is yes the introductory contacts can take plan if they are approved and the court is going to be asked to make the order. It would be important for your daughter to go to someone with whom she is familiar rather than from foster carers to a completely strange place and people.

The contact they might have does not mean you cannot continue to oppose the special guardianship order being made. The final decision will be made by the court on the basis of what is considered best for your daughter’s welfare and long term care if she is not able to return to your care.

You may find it helpful to read our advice sheets Duties on Children’s Services when children are in the care system and Special Guardianship: what does it mean for birth parents?.

Your solicitor, who will know your case, will be able to explain anything about this situation and it may help for you to have a discussion with him or her.

Should you wish to speak to an adviser, you can telephone our free confidential advice line on 0808 801 0366. The advice line is open from 9.30am to 3pm Monday to Friday (except Bank Holidays).

I hope you find this helpful.

Best wishes

Suzie

Lolli
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue Jun 02, 2020 3:07 pm

Re: Permancy planning meeting dispute

Post by Lolli » Wed Jun 17, 2020 3:28 pm

Hi thank you for your reply, my daughter's gaurdians is due to make her recommendations next week and it's looking hopefull that she will be supporting my daughter's move back to me, I wanted to ask one more question if possible, what is the general length of the statement I need to present to the court at the final hearing? I have been told that my solicitor should be writing it but she is adamant it needs to be in my words in the first instance, I was wondering if you have a guidance or templates I could utilise.
Many many thanks

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Suzie, FRG Adviser
Posts: 3460
Joined: Mon Jul 04, 2011 2:57 pm

Re: Permancy planning meeting dispute

Post by Suzie, FRG Adviser » Wed Jun 24, 2020 4:37 pm

Dear Lolli

Thank you for your further post.

I am sorry that you feel that you need to write a statement yourself. Usually, a solicitor would obtain a client’s instructions in order to draft the statement taking into account what the client wishes to comment on in respect the evidence which has been sent to the court by other parties. This is important as you are due to have the final hearing.

This statement should also would also include what you wish to tell the court yourself. It may be that your solicitor wants you to put in writing what you wish to say so that he or she can prepare your statement.

I suggest you discuss this with your solicitor so you can be clear about what is being asked of you.

I hope this helps

Best wishes

Suzie

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